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Perhaps those who built the Large Hadron Collider (Lynn Evans, Steve Myers, etc.) deserved the Nobel Prize in 2010 after demonstrating on March 30, 2010 that LHC reached the world record power of 3.5 TeV. Instead, the CMS and Atlas experiments were mentioned in the Noble Prize for Physics in 2013 after proving building detector instrumentations that did not have the capability to identify and measure new particles capturing only 100 candidates out of 100,000 boson like particles produced by LHC.

On October 21, 2008, CERN celebrated LHC success, after the failure of melting 50 magnets the month before and not detaining the record of the highest power in Accelerators in the world that was detained by the Tevantron Accelerator at FERMILab in the U.S. However. When LHC achieved results, surpassed the Tevatron, became the most powerful accelerator in the world was ignored and their leaders did not receive the Nobel Prize. Instead, CMS and Atlas experiments were mentioned in the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physics as successful, although they failed in 20 years to build a detector instrumentation capable of executing “object pattern recognition algorithm” that was invented 22 years before and therefore, could not capture most of the 100,000 new particles CERN LHC. This enthusiasm ended nine days later when they melted 50 magnets, however, the champagne celebration continued with the delegation from 38 countries in the world. Perhaps those who built the Large Hadron Collider (Lynn Evans, Steve Myers, etc.) deserved the Nobel Prize in 2010 after demonstrating on March 30, 2010 that LHC reached the world record power of 3.5 TeV. Instead, the CMS and Atlas experiments were mentioned in the Noble Prize for Physics in 2013 after proving building detector instrumentations that did not have the capability to identify and measure new particles capturing only 100 candidates out of 100,000 boson like particles produced by LHC. Despite this failure of wasted time and money, there was no call for Aymar’s resignation, and plans for a big champagne celebration scheduled for a few weeks later in which delegates from 38 countries were to attend, continued. LHC restarted the activity reaching 3.5 TeV on March 30, 2010, and operated until February 11, 2013, when it was shut down for two years to upgrade its power to 6.5 TeV (still only 65% of its nominal power of 10 TeV, one third the SSC). The evidence of failure of the 50 melted LHC magnets on September 19, 2008, was turned into a celebration of success on October 21, 2008, with the participation of delegates from 38 countries. What could be better evidence of failure than 50 melted magnets, the disappearance of 7 tons of liquid helium, the blown away doors of the LHC tunnel, millions of dollars in damage, and a 14-month delay, etc.?

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